Finland regions

Finland still has a good chance to focus its efforts on prevention

“We must not be fooled thinking that things that happen in Sweden couldn’t happen in Finland,” Salihu says in the Hanaholmen podcast, and he goes on to say that Sweden has become a transit country for drugs en route to the Finnish market. .

Journalist Diamond Salihuwho currently works for Swedish television SVT, was awarded the 2021 Swedish Grand Prix for Journalism in the Voice of the Year category and gained a unique level of trust in criminal circles.

Her book ‘Till Everyone Dies’ (Tills alla dör), published in 2021, received unanimous praise in the Swedish media and was described by Finnish Svenska Yle as “a balanced and strong depiction of wars of gangs in Sweden”.

In the Röster från Hanaholmen podcast, Salihu reveals why he started following gang-related issues in particular.

“Right now, gang crime is a sore point for society as everyone is trying to figure out what is going on. Why are so many young men being shot? Salihu asks.
Salihu followed a certain conflict in one of Stockholm’s most restless neighborhoods and tried to see it from a broader social perspective.

“When you understand the conflict, you can understand, on a larger scale, what is happening all over Sweden,” says Salihu.

The problem affects not only big cities, but also smaller ones, now that fatal shootings have occurred in places like Eskilstuna, Kalmar and Örebro.

“This is not an isolated issue, as it is continually spreading and coming closer to people who become aware of it and want to better understand what is going on.

You can no longer close your eyes to the problem in the same way as you could, say, five years ago.

According to Salihu, the gang problems are based on the widespread drug use in Sweden, a problem that also affects Finland on several levels.

“Police say Sweden has become a transit country for drugs en route to Finland, among other countries,” Salihu says.

Salihu is well aware of the growing concern about gang crime in Finland, and in particular in Helsinki.

“In my opinion, the problem is still in its infancy, compared to the problems we face in parts of Stockholm.”

Salihu urges Finland to be on its guard and learn from what happened in Sweden.

“Make sure your regions and your schools are not segregated like it is with us in Sweden. Make sure that young people have things to do, that they finish their studies and that they do better choices in life. You shouldn’t be lulled into thinking that things that happen in Sweden couldn’t happen in Finland,” Salihu concludes emphatically.

Listen to the full Diamant Salihu interview here.

excluding tax

Source: Hanaholmen – Swedish-Finnish Cultural Center